Why Study Music Education?

Music is important in our schools. In order for children to develop a love for and skill set in music, we need capable and passionate music teachers. With a Music Education major in Pennsylvania, you will graduate with a PK-12 Instructional I Teaching Certificate to teach Music in K-12 public and private schools in Pennsylvania. In many cases, that license is also transferable to other states. Our students have also gone on to pursue graduate degrees in music and performing arts.

Music Education @ E-town means:

music means Extensive honors opportunities
Extensive honors opportunities

Music education students often complete honors projects in research, composition, or performance. Extended teaching opportunities are available through our community music division. Students have been published in academic journals and have had compositions performed.

music means Four-year completion
Four-year completion

While many schools have increased the time necessary to complete a degree, we remain dedicated to a 4-year degree program. Our students work hard, but they also finish within four years.

music means Intensive small-class attention
Intensive small-class attention

With class sizes ranging from four to eight students in each music education classroom, we value intensive interactions. Small class sizes give you more opportunities for feedback, individualized opportunities, chances to be heard, stronger peer bonds, and relationships with professors that go beyond the classroom. We personalize experiences based on each student’s interests, needs, and career goals.

music means Rich integration of technology
Rich integration of technology

First-year students take coursework in music technology, developing the skills needed to succeed throughout the curriculum. Other tools used include: stteach© (online tool for observations), an ipad orchestra in world musics, qualQuery©, Sibelius, audio recording software, and digital video analysis of conducting.

music means Strong coursework
Strong coursework

Excellent coursework in theory, history, aural skills, piano and guitar means that you will develop into a well-rounded musician. Whether it is studying with Grammy-winning guitarist, David Cullen, or pianist Debra Ronning, our students receive supportive expert instruction.

music means Field Experiences at every level
Field Experiences at every level

From your first-semester freshman experience to student teaching, students engage in field experiences at every level. Students in field experiences are observed nearly every week with extensive feedback.

music means Being part of an intentional community
Being part of an intentional community

In the freshman year we take a strengths finder inventory and develop conversations about our diverse strengths as we form community. Our weekly repertoire class brings everyone together to challenge our performances, develop our confidence, and support our community.

music means Reputation among public schools
Reputation among public schools

In the past two years, 100% of our students have been hired or pursued alternative pathways (graduate school) within three months of graduation. Our students have been hired in Maryland (80% of graduates), New Jersey, and Florida.

music means Extensive conducting opportunities
Extensive conducting opportunities

Small class sizes mean more conducting opportunities! We work hard to provide extensive conducting opportunities in front of multiple college ensembles.

As a music education major at Elizabethtown College, not only will you learn how to teach music and music theory, you will also master a variety of skills such as music theory, aural skills, singing, keyboard, guitar, music history, conducting, teaching and instruction, arranging musical scores, and playing different string, wind, and percussion instruments. You will also take education courses in teaching fundamentals, teach and observe in area schools, and perform a senior recital.

Our music education classes are small, allowing for individual attention from professors. With class sizes ranging from two to eight students in each music education classroom, we value intensive interactions. Small class sizes give you more opportunities for feedback, chances to be heard, and relationships with professors and peers that go beyond the classroom. Our students and faculty remain dedicated to an ethic of intentional community. We seek to see each other for our strengths and grow as a supportive, diverse community of future teachers. Our focus on real-world learning allows you to develop and practice your skills in the classroom while also exploring different age groups or grade levels, and who you are as a future teacher.

View the course options and requirements for the degree.

The Elizabethtown advantage

Etown Advantage
Etown Advantage
Etown Advantage
Etown Advantage

As a music education major, you’ll enter the classroom your first semester at Elizabethtown. We have worked hard to build a strong and positive reputation with schools locally and nationally so our students can earn jobs quickly to start giving back. For the past three years, 100% of our students have jobs or have entered graduate school within three months of graduation.

We understand that technology competency is a vital skill. That’s why our music education coursework integrates technology at all levels. First year students take coursework in music technology, developing the skills needed to succeed throughout the curriculum. Other tools used include: stteach© (online tool for observations), an iPad orchestra in world music, qualQuery©, Sibelius, audio recording software, and digital video analysis of conducting.

While many schools have increased the time necessary to complete a music education degree, we remain dedicated to a 4-year degree program. Our students work hard, but they also finish within four years.

Because it was a small school, I was able to do a broad range of experiences that included composition and directing the band that set it apart from experiences that I would've gotten at a larger school." 

-Brad Eargle