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Thursday, February 23, 2017 • 7:30 pm
Hoover 110

LECTURE
A Glimpse of Life in the Dawdihaus

In collectivist cultures such as the Amish and other Plain communities, the good of the community is the focus and the family is a microcosm of that collectivist culture. In these families, the older family members often remain in or near the main family dwelling in what is known as the Dawdihaus. The desire to move into the Dawdihaus and the assumption of greater household roles by the adult children is not a forced concept but one that is proliferated by a yielding, a submission and grace referred to as Gelassenheit. Claire Marie Mensacks talk presents an assessment of the Dawdihaus experience from the perspective of the older family members and their adult children who reside together. It is based on her case study among the Amish and other Plain people of Pennsylvania and Delaware.

Claire Marie Mensack is an assistant adjunct professor in the social and behavioral sciences department at Newberry College in Newberry, South Carolina. She holds a PhD in public health from the University of South Carolina and was the Young Center’s Kreider Fellow in spring 2016.  


Thursday, March 30, 2017 • 7:30 pm 
Hoover 110

KREIDER LECTURE
Encountering Low German Mennonite Women in Mexican Archives 
 

Rebecca Janzen will introduce Low German Mennonites in Mexico, and describe their largest church groups, land use patterns and language. Her lecture will focus on the presence of Low German Mennonite women in Mexican archival documents that deal with land redistribution and related conflict with Indigenous people. Janzen argues that in spite of the women’s less powerful religious position, their presence in these documents shows that they are important in keeping the Low German Mennonite community together.

Rebecca Janzen, the Young Center’s 2017 Kreider Fellow, is an assistant professor of Spanish at Bluffton University. She received a PhD from the University of Toronto in 2013 and her first book, The National Body in Mexican Literature: Collective Challenges to Biopolitical Control, was published in 2015 by Palgrave Macmillan. Janzen has been awarded a Plett Foundation grant and the C. Henry Smith Peace Scholarship to begin her second manuscript, Liminal Sovereignty: Mennonites and Mormons in Mexican Popular Culture, which she looks forward to completing at the Young Center.


Wednesday, April 19, 2017 • 7:30 pm 
Susquehanna Room of Myer Hall

DURNBAUGH PANEL DISCUSSION
Got Schnitz? Pennsylvania German Material Culture 
 

Joshua R. Brown and two panelists will introduce Pennsylvania German culture and discuss specific details that characterize the Pennsylvania Germans.

Joshua R. Brown is an associate professor of German at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He received his PhD in German and linguistics from the Pennsylvania State University. With Simon J. Bronner, he is the coeditor of Pennsylvania Germans: An Interpretive Encyclopedia. He is also the coeditor of The Comprehensive Pennsylvania German Dictionary and the coauthor of Schwetz mol Deitsch: An Introductory Pennsylvania Dutch Course. In addition, he has written articles on Amish society and culture and on the Pennsylvania Dutch language.


Thursday, April 20, 2017 • 6:00 pm
Susquehanna Room of Myer Hall

ANNUAL YOUNG CENTER BANQUET 

The annual Young Center dinner gives faculty, staff, students, church leaders, and other friends of the Young Center the opportunity to socialize and learn about the Center’s activities and programs.

A reception for Durnbaugh Lecturer Simon Bronner will be held at 5:30; the dinner will begin at 6:00.

Cost for the dinner is $23 and reservations are required by April 6.


Thursday, April 20, 2017 • 7:30 pm
Susquehanna Room of Myer Hall

DURNBAUGH LECTURE
New Directions in Pennsylvania German Studies
 

A vanishing rural folk life was the original focus of scholars interested in Pennsylvania German culture. By the mid-twentieth century, the focus shifted to ethnic-regional studies that challenged notions of accommodation to industrialized society. Simon J. Bronner will lecture on the quest to redefine a “new” Pennsylvania German studies in the twenty-first century. The new approach includes multiple disciplines to analyze representations of culture and lived experience. Bronner will examine the implications of this new approach and the questions it raises for the future of Pennsylvania Germans.

Durnbaugh Lecturer Simon J. Bronner is Distinguished Professor of American Studies and Folklore and director of the Center for Pennsylvania Culture Studies at Penn State Harrisburg. He has also taught at Harvard University, Dickinson College, Leiden University (Netherlands), and Osaka University (Japan). The author and editor of over thirty-five books, his titles include Pennsylvania Germans: An Interpretive Encyclopedia,  Encyclopedia of American Folklife, Popularizing Pennsylvania, and Explaining Traditions: Folk Behavior in Modern Culture. He served as editor of the Pennsylvania German History and Culture Series for Penn State Press and received the Pennsylvania German Society’s Award of Merit for lifetime contributions to Pennsylvania German studies.


Friday, April 21, 2016 • 10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Hoover 110

DURNBAUGH SEMINAR
Object Lessons: The Meanings of Pennsylvania German Life and Culture
 

Joshua R. Brown and several panelists will speak in depth about Pennsylvania German culture, especially how their academic backgrounds inform Pennsylvania German research. The panel will highlight the importance of multidisciplinarity in a “new” Pennsylvania German studies

Joshua R.  Brown is an associate professor of German at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He received his PhD in German and linguistics from the Pennsylvania State University. With Simon J. Bronner, he is the coeditor of  Pennsylvania Germans: An Interpretive Encyclopedia . He is also the coeditor of  The Comprehensive Pennsylvania German Dictionary  and the coauthor of  Schwetz mol Deitsch: An Introductory Pennsylvania Dutch Course . He has also written articles on Amish society and culture and on the Pennsylvania Dutch language.

Cost for the seminar is $10, which includes lunch. Reservations are required by April 6. 



Elizabethtown College